Home Doctor NewsGynecology News Antiseptics may be just as effective as antibiotics in preventing recurrent urinary tract infections.

Antiseptics may be just as effective as antibiotics in preventing recurrent urinary tract infections.

by Pragati Singh

According to researchers, methenamine hippurate, an antiseptic therapy, is nearly as effective as antibiotics in treating urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. They go on to say that methenamine hippurate does not contribute to antibiotic resistance. At least half of adult females will have a UTI at some point in their lives. Lower abdomen pain, a burning sensation while urinating, and increased urine frequency are all symptoms. Drink plenty of water and take showers instead of baths, according to experts, to reduce your chances of getting a UTI. Methenamine hippurate, a non-antibiotic therapy, may help women with recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs). Researchers claim that the antiseptic therapy serves as a prophylactic without contributing to the rising problem of antibiotic resistance in a new studyTrusted Source.The study looked at 240 women over the age of 18 who had recurrent UTIs and was published in the British Medical Journal. Participants were given either methenamine hippurate or a low-dose antibiotic at random.

The trial lasted 18 months, including three-monthly follow-up visits for the women.

At least one UTI occurs in 50 to 60 percent of adult women at some point in their lives. Recurrent infections affect about a quarter of the population. Methenamine hippurate, a non-antibiotic therapy, may help women with recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs). Researchers claim that the antiseptic therapy serves as a prophylactic without contributing to the rising problem of antibiotic resistance in a new studyTrusted Source.

The study looked at 240 women over the age of 18 who had recurrent UTIs and was published in the British Medical Journal. Participants were given either methenamine hippurate or a low-dose antibiotic at random. The trial lasted 18 months, including three-monthly follow-up visits for the women. At least one UTI occurs in 50 to 60 percent of adult women at some point in their lives. Recurrent infections affect about a quarter of the population.

What researchers found
In their study, the researchers concluded that methenamine hippurate could be a viable option to daily antibiotics for women with recurrent UTIs. Women receiving antibiotics had.89 instances, while those on methenamine hippurate had 1.38 incidents, according to the study. There were more UTI occurrences in women receiving the methenamine hippurate, but the researchers considered it to be “non-inferior to antibiotic prophylaxis.”

Dr. Christopher Harding, the study’s principal author and the chairman of the European Association of Urology Guidelines, said, “This research provides the highest quality evidence to date outlining the clinical benefit of a non-antibiotic preventative medication.” “Previous research has suggested that methenamine may be beneficial, but this experiment adds to the body of data.”

“Our results could encourage a change in practise in terms of preventive therapy for recurrent UTI and give patients and clinicians with a realistic alternative to daily antibiotics,” Harding told Healthline. “The data from this study will enable clinicians and patients to make collaborative decisions about UTI prevention treatments.” “The study found a tiny numerical difference in UTI incidence between the daily antibiotics and methenamine hippurate groups, but the potential trade-off includes drug avoidance, which is linked to antimicrobial resistance development,” he noted.

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?
According to the Urology Care Foundation, “a UTI is caused by germs that get into your urine and move up to your bladder.”

UTIs can affect everyone, but they’re far more common in women’s urinary systems because the urethra is shorter, allowing bacteria to reach the bladder more quickly.

A UTI can cause the following symptoms:

increased frequency of urinating cloudy or bloody urine pain in the lower abdomen and potentially the lower back burning or pain when urinating A low-grade fever may also be present in some patients.

UTIs should be treated by a doctor because they can lead to kidney infections, which are far more serious. If you have a temperature over 101°F, exhaustion, pain in your side, back, or abdomen, nausea, or vomiting, call your doctor right once.

Preventing Urinary Tract Infections
UTIs affect some people more than others. Everyone, on the other hand, can take actions to lower their chances of acquiring one.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Source you can trust:

Urinating after sexual activity is a common occurrence.
Showering instead of bathing and drinking plenty of water
Wiping from front to back after urinating to avoid douching, sprays, or powders in the genital area
You can also include probiotic items in your diet, such as yoghurt, kefir, sauerkraut, or tempeh, or talk to your doctor about taking probiotic supplements.

Some forms of birth control can increase your risk of developing a UTI, so if you’ve had multiple UTIs, talk to your doctor about them. These are some of the forms available:spermicide, including condoms with spermicide diaphragms nonlubricated condoms

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